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Articles - Étudiants SUPINFO

Introduction to the Big Data

Par Nezha EL GOURII Publié le 01/09/2016 à 13:59:38 Noter cet article:
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Introduction

Today global enterprises are collecting, storing and working with unimaginable amounts of data and information. According to experts, global organizations and enterprises now gather in excess of 2.5 quintillion bytes of data everyday.

The raw data originates from sources such as mobile devices, electronic transactions, social media conversations, electronic sensors, remote cameras, RFID readers and the like.

This tsunami of raw information is currently being referred to as “Big Data.” IT professionals around the globe are now being challenged to manage, organize and analyze these vast data sets strategically.

What is Big Data ?

Big Data refers to a very large data set , no conventional database management tool or information management can really work. Indeed, we procreate about 2.5 trillion bytes of data every day.

This information come from everywhere : messages we send or videos we publish , weather information, GPS signals, transaction records of online purchases and much more.

This data is named Big Data or massive data volumes. The giants of the Web, the first of which Yahoo (but also Facebook and Google), were the very first to deploy this technology.

However, no specific or universal definition can be given to Big Data. Being a polymorphic complex object, its definition varies between communities who are interested in as a user or service provider.

Big Data Opportunity

The database marketplace is defined by the following segments.

Storage for data : this is primarily hardware, and even though Big Data uses less expensive hardware, it uses a lot of it. I suggest this will go upwards as we deploy more and more supercomputing platforms. In particular, if we start seeing lots of changes into solid state drives for data nodes. We just will get more for our money in this market space.

Servers for databases : this is the high-end servers and the licensing fees with the supporting consulting. This probably will see changes due to the impact of open source licensing.

Business intelligence : this is the marketplace for traditional data warehousing. This segment will also see a lot of changes. The more traditional OLAP solutions will certainly be replaced by supercomputing platforms. But the number might very well increase as former BI solutions migrate to become the backbone technology for many global companies.

Advanced analytics : this is a moneymaker. Absolutely this small market segment will increase. There will particularly be a lot more dollars spent in terms of consulting and training.

Data integration : another sure winner. There's a lot of stranded data to be rescued and these are tough jobs with a lot of challenges. There will be a lot of new software tools and a lot of small niche companies emerging in this space.

Text analytics : another small segment which may come with some interesting surprises. There are a handful of very specialty companies here, but any one of them could bring forward a remarkable solution with universal appeal.

Challenges of Security and Privacy

All of us understand that technology in and of itself is amoral. It's the people who use it that determine its morality. There's an impressive and tremendous list of positive uses for Big Data. But there are just as many possible immoral, bad, and criminal uses for it.

Big Data can be very destructive in the wrong hands. Right now, today, we have to defend against an organized criminal effort, using supercomputing platforms to conduct financial crimes.Entire industries are coming under threat from these criminal attacks.

Let me give you just one small example: Big Data technology is being used by organized crime to now run a cyber scam. The criminals use the platform to identify victims, normally elderly, and their relationship to new relatives who are traveling to foreign countries. They then make a call, and impersonate foreign officials asking for immediate payment to post bail, or to pay for urgent medical care.

The collection of Big Data gives them enough data to make the con work. The issue of security is on the top list of engineering and operational challenges to be dealt with in any Big Data implementation.

Big Data may be the arms race of the 21st century. In 2009 the US military stood up an entire command structure called Cyber Command. The issue is again the collection of vast amounts of data that can be used to attack the economy, infrastructure, and personnel of the opposition.

It is proposed that this will be the battlefield of the next war, and there may be no shots fired to bring down the enemy. Today there are real threats of using cyber blackmail to bend an enemy to your will.

One example of high concern in the United States is the electrical grid system. It is not as tightly secured as it should be, and it could be penetrated and controlled by those with hostile intent. We can expect ever-increasing amounts of engineering, resources, and money to be spent on cyber warfare.

Is Big Data the end of privacy as we know it?

The answer is fundamentally yes. Each of us in the modern world leaves an ever-increasing digital footprint, which is detailed and complete. This footprint is only going to get larger and even more connected. There is a number of companies that make revenue by tracking every click, and every second you spend on the Internet.

The number of companies, government agencies, and research organizations that track and use the telephony data from mobile phones is growing rapidly. They track every movement of a switched on mobile phone, and store all this collection into a Big Data solution.

Now the correlation of tracking data to psychosymmetrics is the heart of recommendation engines, such as those used by Netflix and Amazon.

These recommendations offer value, and they do make our lives easier in a very increasingly complicated world. But we are giving up a lot of what is traditionally considered privacy.

Conclusion

The Age of Big Data is here, and these are truly revolutionary times if both business and technology professionals continue to work together and deliver on the promise.

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